Easter Eggs for my kids

As old age creeps up on me, I’m finding it more and more difficult voicing my feelings without crying like a wimp. I’ve become a sentimental old fart. It has always been a tradition in our family to give chocolate Easter eggs to the kids on Easter Sunday. Unfortunately, with Brad and family being in the UK and Evan in China and Darren and Amanda in Taupo for the weekend, I thought I’d share with you what it is like to be a father of three wonderful boys. This is my “Easter Eggs” to them.

My Precious Sons

You are all very special to me, each with your own unique personalities. I am so proud of you that it is hard to find the right words to describe my feelings.

Brad, you have always been your own man and showed independence at an early age, I attribute this to the fact that we sent you to Uthongathi. Although, I sometimes wonder if we did the right thing. Both Mom and I missed you so much during your years at Uthongathi but we thought it would be good for you, in retrospect, and seeing how you have turned out, I believe we made the right decision. Both your Mom and I are well aware of all the mischief you got up to in your teen years, but I had no doubt what so ever that you would turn out okay. You have not turned out just okay; you have turned out more than a father could ever wish for, you have given mom and I two beautiful grandchildren and you have found a wonderful girl to share your life. I am very proud to be your Dad, I love you son.

Darren, my middle boy, my cool kid, my boy with the beautiful big brown eyes. You are much more than just that; you are a loving and sensitive person. Your wonderful sense of humour (which you got from Mom) has kept me and Mom in laughter over the years. You have and still make us proud with all your numerous achievements. You have taken the responsibility of marriage in your stride and shown us what I had no doubt about, that you are an intelligent, upstanding, mature and wonderful person. I know that Amanda made the correct choice when she picked you as her husband. Most of all you are my beautiful boy who I’m very proud of and adore.

Evan, my sweet, sweet boy, words cannot describe the feeling of pride I have for you. Your ability to master such a difficult language as Mandarin still leaves me gob-smacked. When I hear you chatting away in Chinese, my heart bursts with pride, it is difficult to fight back the tears of joy. Your musical achievements over the years have brought much joy to all the family. Your keen sense of humour and your good looks makes you very popular with friends and family alike. I think you are one of the bravest people I know and I’m so proud to be your dad, I love you and miss you very much.

Have a Happy Easter.

Your Dad

Alf

 

Writer’s Block

Since completing and publishing “Life is…”, I have had some very positive feedback and some not so positive silence. However, that does not change the fact that writing the book was, next to teaching English to non-English speakers, one of the most rewarding experiences of my life. Why then is it so difficult getting back to writing the sequel? The whole plan was that “Life is…” was to be a trilogy but all I’ve managed is the first one. When I sit down at the computer my mind goes blank, well not exactly blank, I just can’t seem to get motivated, what is it?

I have started number two of the trilogy and have managed to draw up a time-line of events which I have put up on the cork board in our study hoping this will give me inspiration, but alas the motivation is just not there. Is this what is known as writer’s block or am I just trying to make excuses for pure laziness?

Last weekend we went down to a beautiful Hotel and Conference Center on the wild West coast to celebrate Irene’s company’s 15th year in business. During the pre-dinner cocktail party, one of Irene’s work colleagues who has become a good family friend of ours, cornered me and proceeded to tell me how much he enjoyed reading my book. I was humbled by the wonderful praise he gave me, he then asked me a very unusual question, he asked if I had read the completed published version of my book. I admitted that I hadn’t but said that I had written it so really didn’t need to read it, at which he said:

“Do yourself a favour and read it as if it was written by someone else, you may be pleasantly surprised and re-motivated.”

Well if that is all it takes to break this so-called writer’s block, I may just try it, or does anyone have an alternate suggestion?

Have a great week.

“Life is too…?